Haile

Haile is a robotic percussionist that can listen to live players, analyze their music in real-time, and use the product of this analysis to play back in an improvisational manner. It is designed to combine the benefits of computational power and algorithmic music with the richness, visual interactivity, and expression of acoustic playing. We believe that when collaborating with live players, Haile can facilitate a musical experience that is not possible by any other means, inspiring players to interact with it in novel expressive manners, which leads to novel musical outcome. Two pieces were composed for Haile, “Pow” for a robotic and human percussionist playing a Native American Pow Wow drum, and “Jam’aa”, for a Middle Eastern drum circle and a robotic percussionist.

 

Videos 

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Reviews

“It was great fun to watch and hear the two-armed robotic drummer, Haile, jam with two humans, each had a drum, each listened, reacted, improvised. Here the electronics were inside Haile’s brain and her drumming was made in acoustic space… the future is now.”


Pierre Ruhe, Atlanta Journal Constitution. “Concert Review” November 11, 15, 2006.

 

“Haile has listening skills and can join and improvise with live players. One of Weinberg’s students played the darbuka. The robot pulled out his arms and gave his own version to the sound of the drum. Real improvisation!”


Yossi Harsonski, Maariv Dailey Newspaper “Event Review” March 22, 2006 (translated from Hebrew)

 

“Gil Weinberg and Scott Driscoll of the Georgia Institute of Technology recently unveiled Haile – a revolution in interactivity and continued proof that man and machine really can make beautiful music together.”


Daniel Levin Becker Becker, Resonance Magazine, “FWD” March 2006

Faculty

Publications

2012

  • Sun, S., Malikarjuna, T., Weinberg. G (2012), “Effect of Visual Cues in Synchronization of Rhythmic Patterns,” accepted to the 2012 International Conference of Music Perception and Cognition (ICMPC 12), Thessaloniki, Greece.

2009

  • Weinberg, G., Blosser B. (2009) “A Leader-Follower Turn-taking Model Incorporating Beat Detection in Musical Human-Robot Interaction” in the Proceedings of the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction, (HRI 2009) San Diego, CA.

  • Weinberg, G., Blosser B., Mallikarjuna, T., Ramen (2009) “Human-Robot Interactive Music in the Context of a Live Jam Session”, in the Proceedings of International Conference on New Instruments for Music Expression (NIME 09), Pittsburgh, PA, pp. 70-73.

2008

  • Weinberg, G. (2008) “Extending the Musical Experience – From the Digital to the Physical and Back”, in Seifert W., Hyun Kim J. and Moore A. (Eds.) Paradoxes of Interactivity – Perspectives for Media Theory, Human-Computer Interaction, and Artistic Investigations. Bielefeld, Germany: Transcript Verlag Press.

  • Weinberg G., Godfrey M., Rea, A., Rhodes, J. (2008) “A Real-Time Genetic Algorithm In Human-Robot Musical Improvisation”, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer Press.

2007

  • Weinberg, G., Godfrey, M., Rae, A., Rhodes, J. “A Real-Time Genetic Algorithm in Human-Robot Musical Improvisation”, Proceedings of International Computer Music Conference (ICMC 2007), Copenhagen, Denmark, pp. 192-195.

  • Weinberg, G., Driscoll S. “The Robotic Percussionist – Bringing Interactive Computer Music into the Physical World”, in Sick. A. and Lishca C. (Eds.) Machines as Agency – Artistic perspectives. Bielefeld, Germany: Transcript Verlag Press, pp. 66-82.

  • Weinberg, G. “The Design of a Perceptual and Improvisational Robotic Marimba Player”, Proceedings of IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN 2007), Jeju, Korea, pp. 132-137.

  • Weinberg, G., Driscoll S. (2007) “Introducing Pitch, Melody and Harmony into Robotic Musicianship”, Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME 2007), New York City, NY, pp. 228-233.

  • Weinberg G., Driscoll, S. (2007) “The Interactive Robotic Percussionist: New Developments In Form, Mechanics, Perception And Interaction Design”, Proceeding of the ACM/IEEE international conference on Human-robot interaction (HRI 2007), Arlington, VA. pp. 97-104.

  • Weinberg, G. (2007) “Musical Interactions Between Humans and Machines” in Sarkar N. (Ed.) Human-Robot Interaction. Vienna Austria: Ars Press. pp. 423-444.

2006

  • Weinberg G., Driscoll S. “Towards Robotic Musicianship” Computer Music Journal 30:4, MIT Press, pp. 28-45

  • Weinberg G., Driscoll, S., Thatcher T. “Jam ’aa – A Percussion Ensemble for Human and Robotic Players” ACM International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques (SIGGRAPH 2006), Boston, MA.

  • Weinberg G., Driscoll S. “Robot-Human Interaction with an Anthropomorphic Percussionist” Proceedings of International ACM Computer Human Interaction Conference (CHI 2006). Montréal, Canada, pp. 1229 – 1232

2005

  • Weinberg G., Driscoll S., Parry M. “Musical Interactions with a Perceptual Robotic Percussionist” Proceedings of IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN 2005) Nashville, TN, pp. 456-461.

  • Weinberg G., Driscoll S., Parry M. “Haile – An Interactive Robotic Percussionist” Proceedings of International Computer Music Conference (ICMC 2005). Barcelona, Spain, pp. 622-625.

Press